A Few Eye Care Tips

How to Choose the Best Sunglasses for Your Eye Health

Most people choose sunglasses based on how they look and how much they cost. But sunglasses are so much more than a fashion accessory. If selected correctly, sunglasses can provide much-needed protection against the sun’s harmful rays.

Why is eye protection important?

The sun projects harmful UV rays all year, not just in the summer and even when it’s cloudy. Anytime you go outside, your eyes are exposed to these harmful rays. Protecting your eyes with quality sunglasses is an important step toward optimal eye health

Left unprotected, your eyes can suffer significant damage from UV rays. UV absorption by your eyes can cause or contribute to a wide variety of eye conditions, including:

Cataracts: Cataracts develop on the lenses of your eyes and lead to blurred vision or even blindness.

Macular degeneration: UV rays damage your retina, resulting in loss of vision and increasing your risk of going blind.

Pterygium: Exposure to UV rays can cause the tissue that lines your eyelids to grow over the white part of your eyes, irritating your eyes and affecting your vision if it reaches the cornea.

Photokeratitis: Also called ultraviolet keratitis, this painful condition results when your eyes are sunburned and causes inflammation of your cornea, light sensitivity, blurred vision, and dry eye.

How do I choose the best sunglasses for eye health?

Not all sunglasses offer UV protection. Even those marketed as UV-blocking sunglasses may not provide the protection you need for optimal eye health

Here’s what to look for when shopping for sunglasses:

Style and fit: Sunglasses with large lenses are good because they protect more of your eye, but wraparound sunglasses block the most sunlight.

Lens tint: While the darkness of the lenses isn’t as important as the UV rating, dark or mirrored sunglasses make it easier to see in bright sunlight, helping you strain your eyes less.

UV rating: Pick a pair of sunglasses that protect against 100% of UVA and UVB rays. Note that not all store-bought glasses offer this kind of complete protection.

How to Choose the Best Sunglasses

Sunglasses may be perceived as a stylish fashion accessory, but in reality they are a key element in maintaining healthy eyes.

Doctors strongly recommend both children and adults wear sunglasses whilst outdoors, to block the sun’s destructive ultraviolet (UV) rays. UV rays can cause a variety of eye ailments, including cataracts, macular degeneration and ev​en skin cancer around the eyelids.

Sunglasses do not need to be expensive to protect the eyes, though very low priced ones may not provide optimal optical clarity. What is important is the label that states the UV protective rating of the sunglasses

According to the American Food and Drug Administration (FDA), a good way to test the optical quality of your sunglasses is to focus on a vertical edge or line and move your head back and forth, “allowing your eyes to sweep across the lens. If there is any wiggle in the line, then the lens may have an optical defect and you should choose another pair.”

Children need sunglasses too!

Children are just as vulnerable to UV rays as they spend more time in the sun than adults. For best UV coverage, they should wear well-fitting sunglasses made from polycarbonate. Children, like adults, should also wear a wide brimmed hat with the sunglasses for added protection when they are spending long hours outdoors. Clothing with UV blocking coating is recommended for additional protection

The Importance of Wearing Sunglasses and How to Choose the Best Ones for You

While it’s no secret that style, fit, and cost are primary considerations for most people when buying sunglasses, they’re much more than just as classic fashion accessory. Of course you want your sunglasses to look good, but you also want them to function properly. Besides helping you see better on bright days, they should also protect your eyes (and the surrounding area) from harmful ultraviolet (UV) radiation.

HOW WEARING SUNGLASSES PROTECTS YOUR EYES

Most people wear sunglasses so they can see more easily when driving or spending time outside on a bright day. While pretty much any pair of sunglasses, including those that don’t offer protection from harmful UV radiation, can help shade your vision, it takes a specific kind of darkened lens to protect your eyes and help preserve your long-term vision.

CATARACTS

Cataracts can make your vision cloudy or blurry, and they may even make colors appear less vibrant. They’re largely considered an age-related problem, because by age 80, most Americans have a cataract or have already undergone surgery to remove one. But did you know that approximately 20% of all cataract cases are caused by extended exposure to UV light?

MACULAR DEGENERATION

Macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in the United States, damages the macula lutea, a small spot near the center of your retina required for sharp central vision. Because this part of the retina contains millions of light-sensing cells, eye experts believe it’s likely that routine exposure to UV rays contributes to the development and progression of the disease.

SKIN CANCER

You may be careful to put on sunscreen when you head outside for prolonged periods of time, but chances are you don’t slather it on your eyelids. Because up to 10% of all skin cancers occur on the eyelid, it’s important to wear sunglasses that offer complete UV protection to help mitigate your skin cancer risk in this sensitive area.

How To Choose Sunglasses

Sunglasses make up a $4 million dollar industry in the United States alone, which means we can assume that people are buying sunglasses all the time. But picking out your next pair of sunglasses can sometimes feel like a burden.

Between all the options, knowing what looks best on you can be hard. Plus, you want to make sure the frames not only look great but also improve your life. If you’re in this situation, look no further. In this article, we’re breaking down everything you need to know how to choose sunglasses. Soon, you’ll be an expert on choosing sunglasses.

How To Choose Sunglasses: Face Shape Comes First

Before you begin choosing sunglasses, you need to figure out what kind of face shape you have. While this might sound a bit trivial, it will help you narrow down what looks best to you.

Why Do You Want Sunglasses?

Next, you want to ask yourself why you want sunglasses. Do you want them for sports or some other hobby?

If so, you’ll want to check out sporting frames that give you better vision. For instance, fishers can have an easier time spotting fish with frames custom-built for that very reason, and hikers can see better views with frames that give more color to the world around them

Tips for Optimal Eye Health

Most of us are well aware of the five senses bestowed to us through which we interact with our environment, i.e. vision, hearing, smell, taste and touch, right? But how many of you have ever really wondered which of these is considered as the most valuable.

Sure, each of these senses is invaluable in its own right, but vision is considered to be the most important of all, as it is used to perceive about 80% of all impressions.

So, now you’re getting a better idea of why you should tend to your eye health much more seriously, and if not, it’s going to hurt your pocket as well. Wait a minute, did I just say ‘your pocket’? Let me get it right, it hurts ‘our’ pockets!

In fact, neglecting eye care not only affects you financially, it also affects your quality of life. One in six American adults (aged 45 and above) suffer from one or the other type of eye problems and the risks associated with vision loss only grow as you age. According to estimates by the American Academy of Ophthalmology (AAO), by 2020, 43 million plus Americans will be affected by age-related eye diseases.

Healthy Diet Healthy Eyesight

Yes, it starts as simple as that; you are what you eat and so is your eyesight. Foods rich in nutrients like vitamin C and E, zinc, lutein and omega-3 fatty acids strengthen your eyes against age-related eye problems like cataracts and macular degeneration.