Roof Installation Tips

Factors To Consider Before Selecting Roofing Material

THE STYLE OF YOUR HOME OR BUILDING

The architectural style of your home or commercial building may dictate what type of roofing materials need to be used. For example, while asphalt shingles are compatible with most styles of homes, tile roofing may be more suitable for the style of historic homes. The style of a commercial property is extremely important when selecting its roof covering. Some buildings may need a built-up roof, while metal roofs might suit the style of other commercial buildings.

THE ROOFING APPLICATION

Whether the new roof is being applied to a brand new structure, as a replacement roof, or as an addition to a home or building makes a big difference in your roofing material selection. With new roofs, you have more choices because you’re not limited to existing components, such as roof materials currently on the roof, the underlying roof structure composition, roof pitch, etc., as you are with replacement roofs. Adding an addition to a home or building also limits your roofing material choices because the roof addition needs to function and blend in with the existing roof structure to which it is being attached.

OWNERSHIP

Roofing is a cost that will give you a return on your investment if you’re staying in your home for most of your life, or remaining as the owner of a commercial building long term. If you’re not planning to own the property for at least 20 or more years, it might be best to install a roof with a shorter lifespan that is less costly.

STATE BUILDING CODES

Some states have building codes or other restrictions that may prevent you from installing a certain type of roofing. For instance, some states at risk for hurricanes, tornadoes, or forest fires may prohibit certain types of roof shingles.

MUNICIPALITY REQUIREMENTS AND RESIDENTIAL COMMUNITY COVENANTS

In addition to state building codes, many municipalities may have their own building requirements that dictate the types and grades of roofing that must be used. If you live in a private or gated community, you may need to adhere to building covenants that outline acceptable types of roofing shingles and roofing material restrictions.

Guide to Roofing Costs & Estimates

You may not think about your roof that much, but as soon as it needs repair it will be impossible to ignore. Even just one leak can cause significant damage to the rest of your home. By properly maintaining your roof and replacing it at the end of its lifespan, you will ensure it does its job of protecting all that lies underneath it. Plus, replacing your roof will increase your property’s value, since potential buyers will have the peace of mind knowing that they’re not going to need to take this project on themselves.

Choosing a Roofing Material

There are several roofing materials to choose from, which will significantly impact how much your roof will cost.

As a general rule of thumb, the more you spend upfront, the longer your roof will last. Depending on your current budget and the amount of time you intend on staying in your home will naturally sway you towards favouring budget or longevity. If you have a particular look in mind, this will sway you more towards style being an important consideration

Durability

Asphalt shingles will typically last anywhere from 15 to 30 years. Mileage will vary depending on many factors, including weather (the warmer the climate, the sooner they’ll need to be replaced) and pests. Depending on the last time the roof was replaced and how long you plan on staying in your home, if your home has asphalt shingles then it is most likely that you will need to replace them at some point.

Advantages of Asphalt Roofs

Perhaps the biggest advantages is that asphalt has lower shingle prices, which is why so many homeowners opt for this roofing material. Asphalt shingles are also highly versatile in their appearance and can be made to look like other materials like slate, wood or tile, and also come in a wide variety of colours, giving your home many customization options.

Metal Roof vs Shingles in Cold Climate – Which Should I Choose?

Although, Huntsville Alabama is known for its warm climate temperatures typically decline during the winter months. The average temperature in AL in January and February ranges between 30-40 degrees. While snowfall varies each year in Huntsville the winter often brings rainy condition. That’s why it’s important to make sure your home’s roof is in optimal condition. Therefore you’ll want to invest in quality roofing materials that can accommodate the weather.

Metal and shingle are the most common roofing materials that are presented to homeowners. These days metal isn’t only reserved for warehouses and industrial properties. A lot of our residential clients have some form of metal roofing. However, shingle roofs are traditional and you can find them on thousands of houses throughout Huntsville. Which material is able to best withstand the colder climate?

How Metal Roof Systems Perform In The Winter

The cold climate and its harsh elements can wear down on your roof decreasing its lifespan and performance. Fortunately, metal is a material that is ultra durable and is effective at withstanding the elements

Reduces Heating Costs

It’s no secret that residential home owners in the U.S spend so much more money heating than cooling during the summer months. Metal functions as an insulator preventing both cold or warm air from escaping. Thus results in significantly lowered energy bills. In fact, the surface temperature of a metal roof tends to stay warmer than the outside temperature while an asphalt shingle roof can be a few degrees cooler.

Less Susceptible to Snow and Ice Damage

Yea, snow, and ice can cause major structural damage to a roof which is why it’s considered to be an enemy to most type of roofing materials. However, a metal roof can provide much more protection. Snow m and doesn’t accumulate on a metal roof. Instead, it literally slides off preventing ice dams and damage to the gutters.

Residential Roofing Best Practices

Asphalt shingles, which cover 80 to 90% of residential roofs, have undergone much change in the last 20 to 30 years. Until the late 1970s, all asphalt shingles were manufactured from a heavy organic felt mat that had established a reputation for both strength and flexibility and generally outlasted their 15- to 20-year life expectancy.

Since their introduction in the late 1970s, fiberglass shingles have come to dominate the market, accounting for over 90% of shingles sold today. However, premature failure of some fiberglass shingles in the 1980s and 1990s tarnished the product’s reputation and spawned a number of lawsuits and resulted in a toughening of standards and a general improvement in fiberglass shingle quality.

Shingle styles have changed as well. The common three-tab shingles of the 1950s and 1960s are now joined by no-cutout shingles, multitab shingles, and laminated “architectural” shingles.

Asphalt Roof Shingle Quality

Shingle quality is often difficult to determine visually since it is based largely on hidden factors such as the strength of the reinforcing mat (organic felt or fiberglass), the strength and flexibility of the asphalt, and the amount and type of fillers used. In most cases, however, the guidelines outlined below can help to select shingles that perform as promised.

Organic Felt vs. Fiberglass Asphalt Shingles

Organic shingles are built around a thick inner mat made from wood fibers or recycled paper saturated with soft asphalt. Fiberglass shingles, on the other hand, use a lightweight nonwoven fiberglass held together with phenolic resin.

CHOOSING A CONTRACTOR: QUESTIONS TO ASK WHEN HIRING A ROOFING CONTRACTOR

There’s no more denying it or putting it off. There are water stains on the ceiling. You’ve found a few shingles in your yard. There are birds, squirrels or raccoons in your attic (or maybe all three, yikes!). Whatever the case may be, the signs are clear: it’s time for a new roof.

Where can I find the best, certified roofing contractors in my area?

Getting a new roof or a roof repair starts with finding the right roofing contractor for the job. You can find the best, certified roofers in your area by checking out our network of independent roofing contractors in the Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network

Roofing companies and contractors in our Owens Corning Roofing Contractor Network are selected for their commitment to customer service, reliability, and professional craftsmanship. Additionally, they must meet high standards and satisfy strict requirements

But, Do I Really Need a Roofing Contractor?

Installing a new roof, or repairing an existing roof, is a big job and a big investment for your home. Working with a qualified and trusted roofer who understands roofing materials, safety, and building codes and requirements will ensure the job is done right. You’ll also have warranty options offering peace of mind that the roofing contractor will stand behind their work for years to come.

Okay. I Want to Hire a Roofing Contractor, But How Can I Tell Who Is Qualified and Who Isn’t?

Most homeowners start with a list of about two to five roofing contractors, and meet with about two to three, before making their final decision on who to hire for the job. Searching for qualified roofers online, or getting recommendations from friends and family, are two ways to get started on creating a shortlist of roofing contractors to consider, but may not give you all the information you need to tell who is qualified and who is not.