The Practicality Of A Commercial Led Electrical Lighting

Tips for Choosing the Best Office Lighting

Tips on choosing the best office lighting in Brea can help you pick the perfect lighting for your office. Lighting does more than illuminate a space; it improves visual clarity, enhances focus and affects mood. Office lighting usually serves one purpose: It makes everything bright so the staff can see and work more effectively and comfortably. However, these lights often cause more problems than they are worth, such as producing glares and flickers. Fortunately, you can improve your office with optimal lighting for maximum work performance.

Pick the right bulbs

Light bulbs range in intensity and color based on the Kelvin scale. Most offices use fluorescent lighting with 6500K bulbs, which resemble the lighting intensity of regular daylight. Make sure every light in the office has the same color temperature for balanced lighting throughout the workspace. In addition, try introducing ambient light to the space. Open a window, or place a lamp on the desk with a low-intensity halogen bulb to render your workspace with more clarity.

Supplement overhead lights with task lighting

Reports from Consumer Health state that overhead fluorescent lighting can cause everything from hyperactivity to sleep problems. Switch to task lighting with low-glare bulbs, and position the lighting away from your computer screen and toward your work surface. Gooseneck lamps are ideal for situations when you need to cast more or less light on an area.

Use indirect lighting

Direct lighting combined with a bright computer screen leads to eyestrain, headaches and low productivity. If possible, turn off the overhead direct lighting and substitute it with indirect lighting from lamps. Space the light fixtures evenly around the office for uniform coverage

Choose neutral colors for the office

Whether you light your space with overhead lights, task lighting or wall sconces, optimize the lighting consistency with a neutral room color. Avoid using dark or bright colors for floors and walls. Instead, use neutral tones with low-range reflectance.

What is an ‘L E D Light’?

The L E D stands for Light Emitting Diode. A light-emitting diode is a small semiconductor device. It emits photons of light when electric current flows through it. LEDs are the light source inside the lamps you can buy from our online lighting store.

LED lights have many advantages over other lighting technologies, including:

Higher energy efficiency (‘lumens per watt’),

Much longer lifetime,

Switch on instantly at full brightness,

Precise control and dimmable options available,

Compact size, cooler operating temperature (reduced fire risk), and more

What to Check When Buying an LED Light

Buying the right LED light can be a little overwhelming at first. But if you follow this short guide, you’ll be on your way to getting the best lighting for your home or business.

Lighting Wattage & Brightness

In the old days, you could buy a ’60 Watt’ bulb from the lighting shop, and that was that. Things aren’t so simple anymore, because LED lights are advancing so quickly. In other words: the wattage of a light bulb or fitting is no longer a direct guide to its brightness. So be sure to look out for the “equivalent wattage” or the actual light output (specified in lumens).

Light Bulb Shape & Base

No one wants to find out the light globe they bought is the wrong one and doesn’t fit. Thankfully, all light bulbs have a code which describes their base and shape. So look out for names on your existing light bulbs. Or, check the spares cupboard, and you’ll be most of the way to buying the correct product. See our related blog post for more information: crack your light bulb codes.

Energy Efficient Lighting

Light Emitting Diode (LED) and Compact Fluorescent Lights (CFL) bulbs have revolutionized energy-efficient lighting. CFLs are simply miniature versions of full-sized fluorescents. They screw into standard lamp sockets, and give off light that looks similar to the common incandescent bulbs— not like the fluorescent lighting we associate with factories and schools.

LEDs are small, very efficient solid bulbs. New LED bulbs are grouped in clusters with diffuser lenses, which have broadened the applications for LED use in the home. LED technology is advancing rapidly, with many new bulb styles available. Initially more expensive than CFLs, LEDs now bring more value since they last longer.

The Status of Energy Efficient Lighting

With a burgeoning supply of far more efficient light bulb options, the EU began a phased ban of incandescents in 2009. followed suit banning the manufacture and import of higher wattage incandescent bulbs beginning in 2014.

LED Light Bulbs

LEDs (Light Emitting Diodes) are solid light bulbs that are extremely energy-efficient. When first developed, LEDs were limited to single-bulb use in applications such as instrument panels, electronics, pen lights and, more recently, strings of indoor and outdoor Christmas lights.

Manufacturers have expanded the application of LEDs by “clustering” the small bulbs. The first clustered bulbs were used for battery-powered items such as flashlights and headlamps. Today, LED bulbs are made using as many as 180 bulbs per cluster, and encased in diffuser lenses, which spread the light in wider beams. Now available with standard bases that fit common household light fixtures, LEDs are the next generation in home lighting.

Which new-generation light bulb corresponds to my old bulb?

Did you know that the lighting in the average home uses around 16% of the total power consumption? This means the lighting in your home holds considerable cost-cutting potential! Replacing your old lamps with a modern alternative is a good start.

When replacing an incandescent bulb or a halogen lamp, you will now have to choose between a LED or a compact fluorescent light. But what exactly is the difference?

Compare wattage

The comparison chart below shows you exactly which energy-saving light bulb or LED lamp you can replace your old incandescent light bulb or halogen lamp with to get the same amount of light (i.e. the power expressed watts).

Think in terms of lumens and forget about watts!

The light output of LED lamps continues to increase exponentially year by year.  Which is why the comparison chart above merely serves as a guideline. Where a 7-watt LED lamp is currently required to deliver a certain light intensity for instance, in a year from now, this may well have dropped to just 5 watts, and is likely to have dropped even further to just 2 watts in four years’ time.

Colour temperature

Alongside the light intensity (number of lumens), the colour temperature is another deciding factor when choosing the right LED lamp.

How to Choose the Right Light Temperature for your Bulb or Fixture

Light appearance is measured in temperature using the Kelvin scale.   Unlike the weather outdoors lower color temperatures (2700K) indicate ‘warmer’ colors of orange and yellow, and higher color temperatures (6500K) indicate cooler colors like blue and white

Know Your Color Temperatures

Most bulbs will advertise color temperature on the package.  This will tell you how warm or cool the color of the light is.

2700K – 3000K – This is the warm or soft white range, best suited for areas in the home where you want to relax or entertain.

3500K – 4500K – This is more a neutral white light range, giving a balance between warm and soft color light.

Over 5000K – Generally referred to as daylight and best suited for use in offices, workshops, bathrooms or other areas where high detail visibility is important. It can also help energize you in the morning.

Some people will also just have a preference for a certain color temperature or mood.  You may even notice a color temperature will look better on your particular skin tone.  The good news is there are options for everyone.

There are also bulbs and light fixtures that adjust color temperature so you can adjust the light to fit your mood or tasks through out the day for even more variety.