Why An Electrician Should Help With Ceiling Fans Installation

Ceiling Fan Buying Guide: Cost, Sizing & Installation

Ceiling fans are a happy meeting of the economical and the esthetic. They’re one of the few household appliances that can save you money — as much as 15 percent off your energy bills — and look good enough to enhance the decor of nearly any room

How to Choose a Ceiling Fan

When shopping for a fan, you’ll need to know what size and style are right for your room and if any of the optional features, such as light fixtures or remote controls, make sense for that environment.

Fans are sized by the length of their paddles, which should be matched to room size. The paddle span on residential fans ranges from 29 to 54 inches. Select paddle size based on the room you want to cool; see “Size It Right.”

If you live in a three- or four-season locale, a reversible fan can provide year-round benefits. During the summer, the forward (counterclockwise) motion of the fan cools the room. With a fan, you’ll conserve power without compromising on comfort. You can typically save between 4 and 8 percent of your cooling expenses for every degree you raise the thermostat in summer.

Ceiling fans can also help lower heating bills — up to 2 percent on heating costs for every degree the thermostat is lowered in winter. To get savings, switch the fan to run slowly in reverse: The clockwise movement breaks up the warm air that collects at the ceiling and pushes it down into the room. (Some fans have a special winter setting, in which intermittent bursts of speed blend warm and cool air.)

How to choose the right ceiling fans for your home.

A ceiling fan adds to the comfort in your home at any time of year. In the warmer months, the ceiling fan creates a welcome breeze. When it’s cold outside, your fan pushes the warm air (that naturally rises upward) back down where it’s needed.

Identify the ceiling fan’s placement. Where do you need the air to circulate? In many rooms, that’s directly in the center. If you have a large area, you might need two fans to handle the job.

Calculate the appropriate fan blade size. Ceiling fans come in a wide range of sizes, with blades that can be as small as just 29” long to as much as six feet! To calculate the right size, multiply the length of the fan blade by two (for the full diameter) and then multiply that figure by the width of the blade. For example, a ceiling fan with 48-inch blades that are two inches wide would cover 192 square feet (48” X 2 X 2”). If you have a bedroom that is 10’ X 12’ (120 square feet), a 30-inch ceiling fan is a good size (30” X 2 X 2”).

Determine the height. The ceiling fan should be placed a safe distance above the people in the room, preferably with the fan blades approximately 8 to 9 feet from the floor. If you’re installing a ceiling fan in a room with an 8-foot ceiling height, choose a flush-mount design. With ceiling heights of 9 feet or greater, you’ll need an extended down rod to lower the fan to a distance where it provides effective air circulation. If you have a slanted ceiling, purchase a slope ceiling mount or slope adapter. To calculate the correct size of the down rod, add 6 inches for every foot over an 8-foot ceiling height. For example, a 10-foot ceiling would require a 12-inch down rod.

Plan for the electrical wiring. Are you replacing an existing overhead light fixture with a ceiling fan? Will your new fixture include both the fan and lighting? Make sure your circuit can handle the ceiling fan’s load. If your ceiling isn’t already wired for an overhead fixture, hire an electrician to safely install the ceiling fan.

How to Choose the Right Ceiling Fan

Most of us don’t think twice before heading off to the shops and buying the first ceiling fan that pleases the eye. At least for me, buying a ceiling fan for the home is a minor detail as compared to say, picking the right lights or choosing the colour of curtains. As it turns out, as if the myriad choices now available aren’t enough to confuse us (growing up, the standard three-blade white fan was a fixture in every home), there is actually a science behind choosing the right ceiling fan. Read these questions and answers to get your money’s worth the next time you need to buy a ceiling fan.

What size ceiling fan should I buy?

The size of the room would determine how big your ceiling fan should be. Fan size is measured by its diameter (blade span), which should be proportional to the space. A fan that’s too small for a room might not stir up enough air and one that’s too big could create a mini hurricane of sorts.

A general rule is that for a room with an area of up to 7 square metres (75 square feet), the fan size should be a maximum of 91 centimetres; 107 centimetres for rooms up to 9.3 square metres(100 square feet), 132 centimetres for rooms up to 21 square metres (225 square feet).

How high up should I hang my ceiling fan?

A fan needs to be suspended 2.4 to 2.7 metres off the ground for optimum air circulation. Do consider the size of the room before deciding on the type of fan – either a hugger fan or a fan with a downrod. Hugger fans, true to their name, hug the ceiling and are meant for low ceilings. Ideal for rooms with ceilings at least 2.4 metres high, they are mounted flush to the ceiling with no extra attachments. A space of 30 centimetres is the minimum required between ceiling and fan.

What’s with the different number of blades?

More is not merrier in this case. The number of blades a fan has is more an element of design than functionality. There is little difference between the performance of a three-, four- or five-bladed fan, so choose one based on preference and style.

WHAT TO KNOW BEFORE YOU INSTALL A CEILING FAN

How Much Difference Does a Ceiling Fan Make?

Ceiling fans help you stay comfortable. We’ve all been in rooms that are either too hot or too cold, or ones that feel as though air isn’t circulating. Put a ceiling fan in that room, however, and there will be a huge difference in the amount of air moved (otherwise known as CFM or cubic feet per minute).

SIZE MATTERS

There are ceiling fans available in all sizes now that can accommodate every space. Some traditionally sized fans may be a better fit for smaller spaces, based on the airflow needs and overall aesthetics. In addition, mini fans – some with just a single blade and small powerhouse motors – can fit in areas as small as closets.

Everyone is aware of the benefits of ceiling fans in summer, but there are many who still do not know the advantages to running a ceiling fan in colder months.

In summer, the ceiling fan should be moving counter-clockwise. (An easy way to check – and point out to your customers – is to stand directly under the ceiling fan to be sure they feel a cool breeze.) The airflow produced creates a wind-chill effect, making you “feel” cooler.

You Want to Put a Ceiling Fan Where?

Make sure customers are aware of the UL-listing for the ceiling fans they are considering. The label details the location the fan is designed for: indoor, damp, and wet.

Ceiling Fan Buying Guide

Am I able to install a ceiling fan in my space?

The vast majority of people find that a fan can be installed in their homes.

How to Choose the size of your fan

Firstly, all fan sizes are given as the diameter (blade span) of the fan. For example, a 52″ fan will measure 52″ from the tip of one blade to the tip of the opposite blade. The greater the diameter of the fan, the more area it will cover. For lounges and living areas, 52″ and 56″ fans are generally a good place to start. In bedrooms 48″ and 52″ fans are usually popular sizes unless the room is very small or unusually large.

Outdoor & Coastal Locations

Australians love the outdoors, with many of us embracing outdoor living areas. The cooling breeze of a ceiling fan can help contribute to a calm and relaxing atmosphere.

AC or DC motor and other considerations

DC fans first started entering the market about 6-7 years ago. At the time of writing this article we offer just over 500 AC fans in our range and over 350 DC. This goes to show how manufacturers have embraced this new technology.

How much airflow will I need?

Airflow is the measurement of air movement generated by the fan, all published figures are based on the highest speed.